Matthew's LSC

Discussion of NON STOCK, NON OEM swaps, upgrades, lowering, modifications, modifying, customizing, anything Lincoln Mark VII. SBB or Suck Bang Blow, refers to Air Intake, Ignition, and Exhaust. Modify this and you'll be golden.

Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby oldschool1 » Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:41 am

Matthew wrote:Here are the balancer pictures that i have handy right now:
...
-Matthew

SHINY!
So far, I've only needed to replace ONE of these. <touches wood>
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby oldschool1 » Wed Feb 21, 2018 6:02 am

Matthew,
You're doing a fantastic job of documenting this!

The Club loves loves loves hands on documentation!

Thank you!
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby neilfeeney » Fri Feb 23, 2018 5:03 pm

interested, post away.
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby Matthew » Tue Feb 27, 2018 10:58 pm

I have been working on the car quite a bit but have been too busy to post the details until now.

Here's a look at the difference between the stock oil pump driveshaft and the new hardened ARP shaft. When you install one of these, make sure that you get the retainer ring adjusted so that the driveshaft will not fall out when you pull the distributor out, but so that there is a little bit of endplay with the distributor installed.
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Here's the new Comp Cams timing set, ready to go on.
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Here's a shot of the Comp Cams timing set installed, straight up. There is a new ARP cam bolt and retainer hardware too.
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Here's a shot with the freshly cleaned up front cover and oil pan installed. One of the things that takes time on a project like this is cleaning up all of the old parts that need to go back on. It's great to have an unmolested car, but that means 28 years of dirt and grease build up on everything too.
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With 180000 km (112000 miles) and 28 years on the clock, there is no ridge on the cylinder walls and you can still see the crosshatch. In the carburetor days, this motor would probably have needed an overbore. As it is, there are probably several hundred thousand miles more moderate driving in the bottom end.
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In preparation for the new heads, I chased all the head bolt threads in the block with a tap.
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I like to soak new valvetrain parts in a 20-50 oil bath before installation. I buy a few new sealable plastic containers like this at Walmart for this purpose. More lubrication is always better than less on startup.
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While you have the heads off, don't miss the opportunity to check that your timing pointer is correct. You can find true top dead center with a dial indicator on the #1 piston like this, then check that the timing pointer says "0".
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In the case of this motor, the pointer was off about 2 degrees.
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It only takes a little tweak to get it right, but once you have done this you can time the engine with a light and be SURE that you are right.
Image

-Matthew
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby Matthew » Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:20 pm

If you are interested in an objective comparison of the weight of stock heads versus aluminum heads, you are in luck.
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The assembled E7TE heads weighed in at 50 pounds each.
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Here's the new TFS track heat 170's on the scale.
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The TFS heads weighed in at 29 pounds each. Other aluminum heads will be very similar. This set of heads will take 42 pounds off the nose of the car once installed.
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I used new ARP head bolts on this project. The hardened washers are chamfered on one side, so pay attention if you are installing them. I like to lubricate the heads and washers with ARP moly lube and lay them out like this in preparation for the install. The outboard bolts on a 302 like this go into the water jacket, so they need a sealer on the threads, while the inboard bolts use moly lube on the threads to get the torque settings right.
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My choice of head gasket for a mild build like this is the Felpro 1011-2. Here you can see a set on the block ready for the heads.
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Here's a shot from the front showing the rocker studs, new hardened TFS pushrods, and the valves.
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If you are going to use the stock valve covers with a setup like this, they will need some clearancing. At the minimum the oil filler baffle and attachment bosses have to be removed. I put paintstick on the rocker arms in the other places which might interfere, install the valve covers and turn the engine over a few times, then check for any witness marks. In this case with the Comp rocker arms, no other clearancing requirements were apparent.
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I used a die grinder to get rid of the oil filler baffle boss on the passenger valve cover.
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All kinds of clearance issues can come up with a new manifold, so it is a good idea to mock up the upper with the fuel injectors, rails, and heater tubes. One reason to use the stock valve covers is to reduce potential clearance issues, and even with the harness adapters on the 47# injectors, there were no throttle linkage or other clearance issues noted. The fuel rail attachment bosses on the new manifold are shallower than stock though, so that will require shorter bolts in the final assembly.
Image

-Matthew
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby Matthew » Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:40 pm

With the motor nearly ready to go back in the car, it was time to check whether the Flowtech headers will fit in the car.
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Here's the bad news: The #8 primary on the Flowtech's comes away from the head significantly before angling down, and unfortunately it interferes with the LSC's steering shaft.
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Here's a view from underneath with the steering shaft removed. I thought maybe I could thread the shaft through the primaries or use a different steering shaft but the #8 primary is 100% in the way, so these headers are just not going to fit.
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Here's a different angle from underneath that highlights the interference problem. Not to worry, plan B is to try the BBK headers that LLFordman got to work, and I have a brand new set on the floor tonight waiting their turn at trying to fit this car!
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In the meantime, I completed swapping parts from the stock lower intake and fitting it out.
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When you install a lower intake on a Windsor style Ford (or any engine with a wedge shaped intake manifold), you should use long studs in the four corners. Not only will these help to hold the intake gaskets in place while you get the manifold on, but they allow you to drop the manifold directly in the correct place in one stroke. That makes it much easier to avoid manifold gasket leaks on the assembled engine which are often caused by moving the manifold around while it is in contact with the gaskets. When you torque the head bolts down, it's a good idea to torque the inboard ones 10 foot-pounds more than the outboard ones in a final step to counteract the wedging effect of torquing down the lower intake.
Image

The whole setup is basically ready to go back in the car, once the header crisis is resolved.
Image

-Matthew
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby 2manymarks » Wed Feb 28, 2018 2:33 am

SUPER GREAT POST!! 8-)
As of July2017, 11 Mark[*] VII's, 3 licensed for the road:
1989 LSC Midnight/Current Red c/c (9G) mostly stock 99k.
1989 LSC Midnight/Current Red c/c (9G) 124k, stock, needs air suspension & bodywork.
1989 Light Titanium c/c (11) Bill Blass - stock. miles unk
1989 LSC Medium Sandalwood (62) Mass air+ 111k FOR SALE $900.
1986 BB (8T) stock 125k (wife'sDD)
1987 BB (4L) stock (miles unk)
1987 Base Model White (9L) 107k (2.73rear)
1984 Turbo Diesel Base model, Platinum (1Q), 131k+ FOR SALE $1000.
Parts cars: 88 LSC, 89 BB, 90 LSC - TLZ 5spd (complete conversion w/extras 4SALE)
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby Brad4d » Wed Feb 28, 2018 3:25 pm

2manymarks...I agree! Matthew, I love the way you explain everything so well, and add those tips in there. So nice to see a professional at work! That's one lucky car!
Bradford (Brad) Bailey
1992 LSC Black on black. all stock
Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia, Canada (No, I don't fish, or play hockey :lol: )
"I'm old enough to know I'm grumpy, just not old enough to know I'm old" (48 yrs.)
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby CDW6212R » Wed Feb 28, 2018 7:35 pm

Well done.

If you/we could just get rid of the blue timing cover gasket that always hangs out way too far, it'd be perfect. I cut the excess one time before painting it, and it still didn't look clean enough. I saw some other high end gasket on Summit a while back, that was grey or black. I'll try that one next time, maybe it'll fit better.
Don
1991 Red Special Edition, my 2nd SE, dead paint, DWS 255/45/17's on 95 Cobra wheels, and soon; DVD/Navi/backup camera, OBDII and the 347, before custom paint.
98 Mountaineer with Continental DWS 255/55/18's, big sway bars, custom brakes. Soon to be A4WD with XP8 bumpers and wing.

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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby LLFordman » Sun Mar 11, 2018 4:40 pm

Hey Matthew, all that progress looks great. Makes me wish I was moving along that fast with my Windsor. :oops: Good call on the intake studs to keep it centered. I have seen folks mess the gasket up a number of times in the past trying to simply drop the lower intake in place. Its easy to mess up the seal along the front and rear valley walls as well. In fact, I never use the included seals but instead use a good RTV for each end. I also use Indian Head gasket shellac around all water ports.
Julian
W4VCO

1990 Mark VII Convertible Twilight Blue
1990 Mark VII LSC SE Dark Titanium (sold to a great Mark VII friend)
1991 Mark VII LSC Titanium Frost
1992 Mark VII LSC Deep Jewel Green (sold to a great Mark VII friend)
1997 F350 PSD CC SRW Performance White
2001 Explorer Limited 5.0 Spruce Green


"I have a plan, just not all the money"
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby Matthew » Tue Mar 13, 2018 1:40 pm

LLFordman wrote:Good call on the intake studs to keep it centered. I have seen folks mess the gasket up a number of times in the past trying to simply drop the lower intake in place. Its easy to mess up the seal along the front and rear valley walls as well. In fact, I never use the included seals but instead use a good RTV for each end. I also use Indian Head gasket shellac around all water ports.


It is shockingly easy to mess up the intake gaskets if you don't use studs like this for sure. I know lots of guys replace the cork china wall seals with RTV, and I have used it. For a modest build like this I have always had good luck with cork when I have treated the seals with care, and in the case of this motor the Ford installed cork china wall seals were not leaking after 28 years. If you use RTV my recommendation is to use Permatex Right Stuff, which is what I use in the corners with the cork. When using RTV, you should lay down a pretty generous bead, and then I prefer to give it at least a day before firing. I also use Permatex Hi-Tack around the water ports which helps to hold the gasket in place during assembly and improves sealing in those critical areas.

For a more radical motor, I have always used Right Stuff RTV, but in many of those cases the cork would never fit anyway.

-Matthew
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby 90 MarkVII BB » Tue Mar 13, 2018 4:02 pm

+1 for great posts... I am so jealous of the shop/set-up you have there to allow you to do all of this haha. I wish i had the space/lift. Makes things so much easier...
"Ivory" - 1990 Mark VII Bill Blass Edition
3G Alternator, Arnott Air springs front/rear, hardwired dashcam, Tigerpaw whitewalls, all 4 brake lines new NiCopp, all else factory.
In the works - Backup cam, Addco#415.
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby oldschool1 » Tue Mar 13, 2018 7:32 pm

Thanks for sharing this with The Community Matthew. I even have a Toyota Tundra Owner following your thread!
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby 2manymarks » Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:27 pm

oldschool1 wrote:Thanks for sharing this with The Community Matthew. I even have a Toyota Tundra Owner following your thread!


:o :o Hey.... I represent that! 8-)
As of July2017, 11 Mark[*] VII's, 3 licensed for the road:
1989 LSC Midnight/Current Red c/c (9G) mostly stock 99k.
1989 LSC Midnight/Current Red c/c (9G) 124k, stock, needs air suspension & bodywork.
1989 Light Titanium c/c (11) Bill Blass - stock. miles unk
1989 LSC Medium Sandalwood (62) Mass air+ 111k FOR SALE $900.
1986 BB (8T) stock 125k (wife'sDD)
1987 BB (4L) stock (miles unk)
1987 Base Model White (9L) 107k (2.73rear)
1984 Turbo Diesel Base model, Platinum (1Q), 131k+ FOR SALE $1000.
Parts cars: 88 LSC, 89 BB, 90 LSC - TLZ 5spd (complete conversion w/extras 4SALE)
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby Matthew » Wed Mar 14, 2018 12:08 am

I'm getting a little behind on this thread with respect to the actual project but I will try to catch up a bit here.

Since the Flowtech headers had no chance of fitting this 1990 LSC, I ordered up some BBK part 1531 headers which are meant for the automatic Mustang. Summit sent them to me overnight to avoid a big delay in the project.
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These are the chrome versions of the headers, laid out with the engine here.
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A shot of the the headers test fit to the engine.
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I test fit the headers with the transmission too to make sure that if they do fit the car, they will fit with the driveline.
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I suspect that they would fit the Lincoln stock linkage as well, but there is obviously no problem with the B&M linkage on this AOD.
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Here's a rear shot with the transmission.
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The real name of the game with headers on these cars is getting them to fit with the steering shaft. Unlike the Fox Mustang, all of the collapsibility is built into the shaft instead of the column.
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A first step on this kind of job is to make an initial test fit. These headers are tantalizingly close, but don't actually fit. The steering shaft is clearly meant to go between the #6 primary and the rest, but it rubs at the upper U Joint.
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The rag joint at the bottom is also a problem with these headers.
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Passenger side fitment was more or less ok, but they were awfully close to a brake line on that side in one place.
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So, clearly some adjustments are necessary to get these headers to work. My first step was to install a set of offset rack bushings that I had laying around from a Mustang project, except I put them in to lower the rack instead of raise it. I also made sure that the collar that goes over the splined shaft on the rack and bolts to the rag joint was set as low as possible on the rack.
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These adjustments solved the rag joint clearance problem, though they will require an alignment when it is all over.
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Next, it was time for a big hammer to relieve the #6 primary to make room for the steering shaft. The most complicated part of this was clearancing the inside of the tube since you can't get a direct swing at it with a hammer. I bolted the header to an old head, then used a long heavy rod on the inside anchored by capturing it under my four post lift, then I was able to strike it with a big hammer and get a relief on the inside of the tube.
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The next step was a big hammer on the part of the tube that interferes with the U joint on the steering shaft.
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Here's another look at the #6 primary relief.
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I also threw away the rubber boot on the steering shaft because that is just going to melt off the first time the headers get hot.
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Once these reliefs were beaten into the headers, the steering shaft cleared fine.
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Another look at the clearance.
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As a final step I put a little dent in the #1 tube where it was so close to the brake line, and wrapped that part with some heat wrap.
Image

-Matthew
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby oldschool1 » Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:13 am

2manymarks wrote:
oldschool1 wrote:Thanks for sharing this with The Community Matthew. I even have a Toyota Tundra Owner following your thread!


:o :o Hey.... I represent that! 8-)

That makes TWO!
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby oldschool1 » Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:33 am

Wow.
The moment you said, "brake line", I immediately said HEAT!
I was thinking more along the lines of a heat shield bolted to the wheel well and THEN covered in (horribly expensive) heat shield material... like NASA uses.
I'm interested in what you wrapped around #1. The product ~I~ had in mind is more of a 'cake' than anything else.
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby Matthew » Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:10 pm

oldschool1 wrote:Wow.
The moment you said, "brake line", I immediately said HEAT!


It doesn't really look that severe to me, but to keep it on the safe side I figured I would take a few preventative measures.

oldschool1 wrote:I was thinking more along the lines of a heat shield bolted to the wheel well and THEN covered in (horribly expensive) heat shield material... like NASA uses.
I'm interested in what you wrapped around #1.


The mitigation steps that I took included taping over the brake line with aluminum tape, as well as sealing the hole in the K-member which is supposed to have a foil heat shield from the factory (which was missing after 28 years). Then I dimpled the #1 tube where it crossed over the brake lines and wrapped it with a foil backed glass cloth heat wrap which is meant for this type of application. The heat cloth is secured to the tube with stainless header wrap ties. I had this stuff laying around the shop from previous projects so I am not 100% sure exactly which manufacturer and part number it is, but this is the kind of stuff that I used: https://www.summitracing.com/int/parts/dei-010401

I feel like the brake line heat protection is probably a little more precautionary than anything - If you just put the headers in with nothing, the brakes would probably be fine - but you might as well take the time to look after the details during assembly because it is harder to fix later if it turns out to be a problem.

-Matthew
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby CDW6212R » Wed Mar 14, 2018 10:54 pm

Good work on the headers. Another member just asked about some shorty headers that interfered with the steering shaft. Like him, you might try swapping the SN95 steering shaft, and rack. Those can go as a pair on any 90-92 Mark VII. I have them on my 91, and I might be able to tell if there is more clearance. I know there isn't a huge rag joint on the later shaft.
Don
1991 Red Special Edition, my 2nd SE, dead paint, DWS 255/45/17's on 95 Cobra wheels, and soon; DVD/Navi/backup camera, OBDII and the 347, before custom paint.
98 Mountaineer with Continental DWS 255/55/18's, big sway bars, custom brakes. Soon to be A4WD with XP8 bumpers and wing.

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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby Matthew » Wed Mar 14, 2018 11:05 pm

Good advice. Since I have this all working now, there doesn't seem to be the need to incur the expense of a new rack, however if I feel that I need to replace the rack, that is probably a good way to go.

-Matthew
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby oldschool1 » Thu Mar 15, 2018 2:52 pm

Matthew wrote:
oldschool1 wrote:Wow.
The moment you said, "brake line", I immediately said HEAT!


It doesn't really look that severe to me, but to keep it on the safe side I figured I would take a few preventative measures.

oldschool1 wrote:I was thinking more along the lines of a heat shield bolted to the wheel well and THEN covered in (horribly expensive) heat shield material... like NASA uses.
I'm interested in what you wrapped around #1.


The mitigation steps that I took included taping over the brake line with aluminum tape, as well as sealing the hole in the K-member which is supposed to have a foil heat shield from the factory (which was missing after 28 years). Then I dimpled the #1 tube where it crossed over the brake lines and wrapped it with a foil backed glass cloth heat wrap which is meant for this type of application. The heat cloth is secured to the tube with stainless header wrap ties. I had this stuff laying around the shop from previous projects so I am not 100% sure exactly which manufacturer and part number it is, but this is the kind of stuff that I used: https://www.summitracing.com/int/parts/dei-010401

I feel like the brake line heat protection is probably a little more precautionary than anything - If you just put the headers in with nothing, the brakes would probably be fine - but you might as well take the time to look after the details during assembly because it is harder to fix later if it turns out to be a problem.

-Matthew

Image

I didn't have the luxury of an empty engine bay when we discovered that we were cooking the passenger front brake line.

I'm told that the covering for the hole was definitely needed but so was the hole; for starter access.

Thanks for the heads up on a similar product.
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby Matthew » Wed Mar 21, 2018 1:39 am

So with the header crisis resolved it was time to start putting the powertrain back in the car. Normally I would bolt the transmission and engine together and drop them in as a unit, but with the steering shaft fitment issues with these headers I figured that it was going to be easier to drop in the motor, install the headers, then install the transmission separately from underneath. The passenger side header can be bolted right up tight and the engine installed like that, then the driver's side header is fitted. To save you guys some time if you try this, here is a step by step for the header install:

    - Once the headers are clearanced and the offset rack bushings are installed, remove the steering shaft.
    - Install the passenger header and tighten it up.
    - Drop the engine without the transmission most of the way in place, but suspended a little bit above the k-member.
    - Install driver's side header from underneath and tighten all fasteners.
    - Even if you cannot get all of the fasteners tight, go ahead and drop the engine onto the K-member and bolt it in place.
    - Install the steering shaft. Use loctite on the threads for the u-joint retaining bolt.
    - If you could not tighten all the fasteners on the driver's side, get the hoist and load leveller out of the way then remove the driver''s side valve cover to gain additional clearance to reach the driver's header bolts.

Image

Once you have the motor in place, the next step is to get the transmission and shifter in. One of the notorious weak spots on an AOD is the secondary input shaft. You have a number of options here, but if you want to keep a close to stock converter with lockup the right choice is to replace the secondary shaft with a hardened secondary like this TCI unit at the bottom of the picture with the factory shaft shown at the top for comparison. The replacement procedure is as simple as pulling the stock shaft out and sliding the hardened shaft back in place.
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It's a good idea to replace the pump seal at the front of the transmission while you have it out of the car.
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The most common assembly problem at this stage is failing to get the torque converter engaged in the pump. To check this, lay a straight edge across the bellhousing face and check that the ends of the converter studs are about 3/8" recessed. I used a depth gauge, but there is a big difference between a correctly seated converted and one that has not engaged the pump, so you can see it visibly. If the studs are not recessed like this, do not proceed with assembly until you have the converter installed right. I didn't take pictures of the install, but while the transmission is tight to get past the headers and in place from underneath, a little patience and the right angles gets the job done. Have enough extensions to reach a long way up with your socket to get the bellhousing bolts torqued up!
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The next hurdle is the B&M Hammer shifter. First, let's take a look at the stock shifter. From the driver's side you can see the front pull shifter cable, the steering wheel lock cable, and the gear indicator illumination bulb.
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On the passenger side you can see the vacuum control for the shifter activated e-brake release. This is never going to work with the Hammer, so you should make a note to disconnect this line in the engine bay as well.
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Here's a shot of the stock shifter and the universal Hammer side by side. They are pretty similar in form factor, but the Hammer needs to be installed a little bit to the right of where the stocker was in order to get the gear indicator panel centered on the console.
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Take the time to mock the Hammer up with the console to be sure you are installing it in the right place.
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Here's a top down shot of the Hammer mocked up with the console.
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The strategy that I used to mount the Hammer was to build adapter plates to bolt it to factory attachment points. I cut these out of some light steel plate with a plasma cutter.
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Here's the Hammer with the rear adapter plate. Note the offset, and that it will bolt directly to the factory shifter's rear mount points on the tunnel.
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You don't need the console for the rest of the installation so I removed it. With the shifter mounted at the back it was clear that there was an interference issue with the bracket in front of the shifter.
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I cut the back part of the offending bracket out with an air saw and unbolted it from the studs. Then I made another adapter plate to attach the front of the shifter to those studs. Don't worry, the remaining portion of the bracket is strong enough to do the job it is supposed to do.
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Here's a shot of the Hammer bolted to the two adapter plates, ready to go in the car.
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With the bracket out of the way, you can cut the 1.5" hole in the floor that B&M calls for, and notch the mount bracket to work with the hole, then you can go ahead an bolt the shifter and cable in place.
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I had a 1.5" grommet on hand that worked well with this setup, but finding a grommet is totally up to you.
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You will also have to tie the steering wheel lock cable in the "park" position as part of the installation.
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Under the car you can see the cable come through near the left side of the transmission, and notice that I used the factory grommet to route the wiring for the Lentech valve body electric OD lockout.
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Here's an overview look at the cable routing from underneath. It is done exactly the way that B&M suggests and works fine. I tried a 3' cable directly to the transmission, but it was going to kink excessively, so the suggested routing turned out to be the best.
Image

The linkage has lots of clearance to the headers too.
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A final, closer shot of the linkage.
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-Matthew
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby Brad4d » Thu Mar 22, 2018 12:55 pm

I'm really enjoying this thread Matthew, thanks. It looks like that Hammer shifter install may not be something I could tackle. At one point, yes, not so much anymore. I was hoping it'd be a more direct bolt in, but when is it ever that simple anyway?! LOL I can't wait to see it all finished off, with the trim. It's not 'Grandpas Lincoln', that's for darned sure!!
Bradford (Brad) Bailey
1992 LSC Black on black. all stock
Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia, Canada (No, I don't fish, or play hockey :lol: )
"I'm old enough to know I'm grumpy, just not old enough to know I'm old" (48 yrs.)
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby Matthew » Wed Mar 28, 2018 11:47 pm

One of the last steps was to install the Performer RPM II upper intake. One issue with the Edelbrock intake is that the threaded bosses for the fuel rail bolts are too shallow for the stock bolts. I ended up having to cut down some 1/4" bolts to around 1/2" to bolt the fuel rails up.
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Here's a shot with the fuel rails bolted up. I used 47# injectors and Jetronic to USCAR adapters to make them compatible with the older Ford harness.
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It's a good opportunity to check the fuel system for leaks when you have everything hooked up, but before installing the upper intake. Everything was fine this time.
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In this day and age a 75mm throttle body seems pretty small, but the Performer RPM II doesn't even support that big of a throttle directly, so I had to gasket match it to work right with the 75mm BBK throttle.
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I use a Sharpie to mark the gasket opening on the manifold.
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It doesn't take long with a carbide bit to match it up. It's a good idea to use some shop towel in the throat of the manifold to reduce the cleanup afterwards. You don't want to leave a bunch of aluminum filings in it to get sucked into the motor when you start it!
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The Performer RPM II upper has a lot of threaded bosses for vacuum fittings. I set it up for PCV, vacuum tree, fuel pressure regulator/MAP, and Evap canister.
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Here's a view of the underside ready to go on the car.
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It did have a little problem getting the AC lines to fit around the upper intake, but managed to massage them enough to fit together.
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Here it is, ready for a test start.
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Finally, I know there have been some questions about how low these long tubes hang. They are not as tight as the stock exhaust, but really they don't create a huge new clearance problem.
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After this, I was able to get the car started up and get the fluids topped up. There are still lots of little details to finish up including adapting a Mustang exhaust to it, but getting to the startup phase is a major milestone.

-Matthew
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Matthew
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Re: Matthew's LSC

Postby 2manymarks » Thu Mar 29, 2018 12:38 am

8-) Can we have a big "AMEN" to that..... I am supremely jealous of your abilities and tenacity, Matthew. Beautiful job! 8-)
As of July2017, 11 Mark[*] VII's, 3 licensed for the road:
1989 LSC Midnight/Current Red c/c (9G) mostly stock 99k.
1989 LSC Midnight/Current Red c/c (9G) 124k, stock, needs air suspension & bodywork.
1989 Light Titanium c/c (11) Bill Blass - stock. miles unk
1989 LSC Medium Sandalwood (62) Mass air+ 111k FOR SALE $900.
1986 BB (8T) stock 125k (wife'sDD)
1987 BB (4L) stock (miles unk)
1987 Base Model White (9L) 107k (2.73rear)
1984 Turbo Diesel Base model, Platinum (1Q), 131k+ FOR SALE $1000.
Parts cars: 88 LSC, 89 BB, 90 LSC - TLZ 5spd (complete conversion w/extras 4SALE)
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Location: Coastal NC-the Right Coast

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