A Guide to Tire Sizes

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A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby eightlives » Tue Dec 30, 2008 6:15 am

Got this from TireRack..

A Guide to Tire Sizes

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The tire size branded on the sidewall provides a significant amount of information about the tire's intended purpose, dimensions, load capacity and high temperature/high speed durability.

Our primary example will be based on variations of the 225/50R16 size, although other sizes will appear where appropriate.
Service Type

Most tire sizes begin with a letter or letters that identify the type of vehicle and/or type of service for which they were designed. The common indicators are as follows:

P225/50R16 91S

P = When a tire size begins with a "P," it signifies the tire is a "P-metric" size that was designed to be fitted on vehicles that are primarily used as passenger vehicles. This includes cars, minivans, sport utility vehicles and light duty pickup trucks (typically 1/4- and 1/2-ton load capacity). The use of P-metric sizes began in the late 1970s and they are the most frequently used type of tire size today.

225/50R16 92S

If there isn't a letter preceding the three-digit numeric portion of a tire size, it signifies the tire is a "Metric" size (also called "Euro-metric" because these sizes originated in Europe). While Metric tire sizes are primarily used on European cars, they are also used on vans and sport utility vehicles. Euro-metric sizes are dimensionally equivalent to P-metric sizes, but typically differ subtly in load carrying capabilities.

T125/90D16 98M

T = If a tire size begins with a "T," it signifies the tire is a "Temporary Spare" ("space saver" or "mini spare") that was designed to be used temporarily only until a flat tire can be repaired or replaced.

LT245/75R16 108/104S

LT = If a tire size begins with "LT," it signifies the tire is a "Light Truck-metric" size that was designed to be used on vehicles that are capable of carrying heavy cargo or towing large trailers. This includes medium and heavy-duty (typically 3/4- and 1-ton load capacity) pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles and full-size vans. Tires branded with the "LT" designation are the "little brothers" of 18-wheel tractor-trailer tires and are designed to provide substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo.

7.50R16LT 112/107Q, 8.75R16.5LT 104/100Q or 31x10.50R15LT 109Q

LT = If a tire ends with "LT," it signifies the tire is either an earlier "Numeric", "Wide Base" or "Flotation" Light Truck size designed to be used on vehicles that are capable of carrying heavy cargo and towing trailers (Numeric sizes), use 16.5-inch diameter rims (Wide Base sizes) or are wider, oversized tires designed to help the vehicle drive on top of loose dirt or sandy surfaces (Flotation sizes). This includes light, medium and heavy-duty (typically 1/2-, 3/4 and 1-ton load capacity) pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles. Tires branded with the "LT" at the end of their size designation are also the "little brothers" of 18-wheel tractor-trailer tires and are designed to provide substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo.

195/70R15C 104/102R

C = If a Euro-metric sized tire ends with a "C," it signifies the tire is a "Commercial" tire intended to be used on vans or delivery trucks that are capable of carrying heavy loads. In addition to being branded with the "C" in their size, these tires are also branded with their appropriate Service Description and "Load Range" (Load Range B, Load Range C or Load Range D).

ST225/75R15

ST = If a tire size begins with "ST," it signifies the tire is a "Special Trailer Service" size that was designed to only be used on boat, car or utility trailers. ST-sized tires should never be used on cars, vans or light trucks.

Section Width

Following the letter(s) that identify the type of vehicle and/or type of service for which the tire was designed, the three-digit numeric portion identifies the tire's "Section Width" (cross section) in millimeters.

P225/50R16 91S

The 225 indicates this tire is 225 millimeters across from the widest point of its outer sidewall to the widest point of its inner sidewall when mounted and measured on a specified width wheel. This measurement is also referred to as the tire's section width. Because many people think of measurements in inches, the 225mm can be converted to inches by dividing the section width in millimeters by 25.4 (the number of millimeters per inch).

225mm / 25.4 = 8.86"

Sidewall Aspect Ratio

Typically following the three digits identifying the tire's Section Width in millimeters is a two-digit number that identifies the tire's profile or aspect ratio.

P225/50R16 91S

The 50 indicates that this tire size's sidewall height (from rim to tread) is 50% of its section width. The measurement is the tire's section height, and also referred to as the tire's series, profile or aspect ratio. The higher the number, the taller the sidewall; the lower the number, the lower the sidewall. We know that this tire size's section width is 225mm and that its section height is 50% of 225mm. By converting the 225mm to inches (225 / 25.4 = 8.86") and multiplying it by 50% (.50) we confirm that this tire size results in a tire section height of 4.43". If this tire were a P225/70R16 size, our calculation would confirm that the size would result in a section height of 6.20", approximately a 1.8-inch taller sidewall.

Internal Construction

A letter (R in this case) that identifies the tire's internal construction follows the two digits used to identify the aspect ratio.

P225/50R16, P225/50ZR16

The R in the P225/50R16 91S size identifies that the tire has a Radial construction in which the tire's body plies "radiate" out from the imaginary center of the wheel. Radial tires are by far the most popular type of tire today representing over 98% of all tires sold.

If the R in the size was replaced with a D (225/50D16), it would identify that the internal tire body plies crisscross on a Diagonal and that the tire has a "bias ply" construction. Tires using this construction are for light truck and spare tire applications.

If the R in the size was replaced with a B (225/50B16), it would identify that the tire body plies not only crisscross the tire on a diagonal as before, but that they are reinforced with belts under the tread area. This type of tire construction is called "Belted." Tires using this construction are practically extinct.

Speed Rating

Today, the only tires that continue to include the speed rating "in" the tire size (P225/50ZR16) are Z-speed rated tires. In this case, following the two digits used to identify the aspect ratio are the letters ZR to identify the tire's speed rating (Z) and its internal construction (R). Since 1991, all other speed ratings are identified in the tire's Service Description (which will be covered shortly).
Tire and Wheel Diameter

P225/50R16 91S

The 16 indicates the tire and wheel diameter designed to be matched together.

Tires that have a rim diameter expressed in inches (P225/50R16, as well as 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 26 and 28) are called "inch rim" sizes, are the most common type of tire size and are used on most cars, minivans, vans, sport utility vehicles and light duty light trucks.

While not as common, two additional "unique" types of tire/wheel diameters are still in use today.

Tires and wheels that have a rim diameter expressed in "half" inches (8.00R16.5LT, as well as, 14.5, 15.5, 17.5 and 19.5) are used on some heavy-duty trailers, heavy-duty light trucks and box vans.

Tires and wheels that have a rim diameter expressed in millimeters (190/65R390, as well as, 365 and 415) are called millimetric sizes. Michelin initiated millimetric sizes for their TRX tires that saw limited use on many different car models in the late 1970s and 1980s.

Michelin PAX System run flat tires have been introduced as an integrated wheel/tire system on a very limited basis as Original Equipment (O.E.) in North America. An example PAX System size of 235/710R460A 104T expresses tire and wheel dimensions in millimeters (235 mm Section Width, tire Overall Diameter of 710 mm and a 460A mm rim diameter, with the "A" in 460A signifying these tires feature "asymmetric" beads in which the outside bead (450 mm) and inside bead (470 mm) are actually different diameters.

All of these "unique" tire/wheel diameters were developed specifically because the tire and wheel design or intended vehicle use required them to be different than conventional tires and wheels. All of these tires and wheels feature bead profiles that have a different shape than traditional "inch rim" sizes.

Tires and wheels with unique rim diameters should never be combined with traditional "inch rim" tires and wheels.

It is critical that the tire and wheel diameters are always confirmed to match before the tire is mounted on the wheel.
Service Description

P225/50R16 91S

The 91S represents the tire's Service Description. A Service Description identifies the tire's Load Index and Speed Rating. Service Descriptions are required on all speed rated (except for Z-speed rated) tires manufactured since 1991. For more information on Service Descriptions
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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby JoshMcMadMac » Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:15 am

Great information. It is also good to include a nice tire size calculator:

http://www.miata.net/garage/tirecalc.html
2005 LS V8: Stock.

(SOLD 07/09)
1992 Mark VII LSC SE: FR500's, KYB's, Kenny Brown C/C plates, subframe connectors, 4.10's, 190lph fuel pump, smog delete, U/D pulleys, T-5, 3G, Mark VIII fan, adjustable FPR, 70mm MAF, 65mm TB, ported Cobra intakes w/ spacer, ported GT40 heads w/ valve job, 1.72 rockers, XE270hr-14 cam, BBK headers, 2½" exhaust w/ off-road X-pipe.
270hp 305ft.lb.

(SOLD 11/07)
1989 Mark VII BULLITT: Shaved trim, emblems, antenna, trunk latch cover, door handles. 100% custom interior, 35% tint, 17" Bullitts, 1800watt custom audio.
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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby Rusty » Sat Aug 04, 2012 10:47 am

Interesting, and thank you for the information. Eightlives.

My question is I what to install 17" Front and 18" Rear or 18" all around.
I have done a little research into this and come up a little short on info.

!] Does anyone have any information on these sizes, What fits and what doesn't
I am concerned on the aspect ratio that fits on both the front and the rear. Rim size. {17X8-9s} and 18X9 or 10s}
Than of course the height 225, 235, 245 etc. Are spacers needed and extended bolts for lugs
A larger tire would make since to me as I would have more contact patch on the road. But I need more information.

2} Tire brand. I like the Toyo Proxie 4s nice tread design. Something to that effect.

Any help woud be helpful and thank you.
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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby oldschool1 » Sat Aug 04, 2012 1:45 pm

For better replies,
ask again in the
MODIFYING forum (http://thelincolnmarkviiclub.org/phpBB3/viewforum.php?f=21).

This is for discussion of stock drivetrains.
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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby tomnh » Sun Jul 14, 2013 5:02 pm

you might want to check out this site if you want bigger tires but don't want to mess with the speedometer gear.

http://www.americanmuscle.com/tire-size-calculator.html
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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby Porterhouse » Thu May 29, 2014 11:22 pm

not to reopen an old thread but I'm trying to figure out what tire and rim size combinations I can get to replace my stock size rim and tire. maybe I just don't know how to use the search feature but I didn't come up with too many results. All I'm trying to figure out is what I can replace my stock rims with and what tires I can throw on them without changing the geometry or the proportions or the engineering of the car.
1988 Mark VII LSC, "Old Faithful," 2nd Owner, Cobra R wheels, 1984 "Continental" style nose & badging, 183K, Owned since August 2001
1989 Mark VII LSC (deceased)
1995 Bronco Eddie Bauer, "The Adventuremobile," 351W, 225K, 4" BDS Lift, WAAG brush guard, 2.5" FM Super 44 exhaust, factory cargo shade
2016 Perception Conduit 13-ft kayak, "Colonel Sanders," technically a vehicle, new favorite toy.

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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby CDW6212R » Fri May 30, 2014 12:15 pm

The geometry won't change, but mostly you have to be careful of clearances for the tire. The 255/45/17 size is the one Grigg's raced and won with in SCCA class with Mustangs. That's 35mm wider than stock, and about 1/2" shorter than stock.

I have that on now, with no contact to the fenders, but the inner tire is very close to the strut baffles(plastic). A wheel with an offset that places it inboard will rub too much on the strut, that's the main clearance point. The wider wheels also will reach full lock faster, as in touching the sway bar before the rack hits full lock.

I'm using the OEM 17x8" wheels(about 30-32mm offset) with no spacers, that's a very good centered baseline to use for a wheel. So you can alter that size on paper or in your head, to move the wheel around with specs, and the tires also. The back you already know can handle much wider tires, but the side to side play of the rear end limits how much inboard the tire can be.
Don
1991 Red Special Edition, my 2nd SE, dead paint, DWS 255/45/17's on 95 Cobra wheels, and soon; DVD/Navi/backup camera, OBDII and the 347, before custom paint.
98 Mountaineer with Continental DWS 255/55/18's, big sway bars, custom brakes. Soon to be A4WD with XP8 bumpers and wing.

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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby Porterhouse » Fri May 30, 2014 5:07 pm

I gotta be honest, that whole thing went a little ways above my head. I mean do I physically measure the tire to see if it will fit in the available space? I've never bothered to upgrade my rims before because I've always been able to find a tire I liked, so I've literally no knowledge base to draw from.
1988 Mark VII LSC, "Old Faithful," 2nd Owner, Cobra R wheels, 1984 "Continental" style nose & badging, 183K, Owned since August 2001
1989 Mark VII LSC (deceased)
1995 Bronco Eddie Bauer, "The Adventuremobile," 351W, 225K, 4" BDS Lift, WAAG brush guard, 2.5" FM Super 44 exhaust, factory cargo shade
2016 Perception Conduit 13-ft kayak, "Colonel Sanders," technically a vehicle, new favorite toy.

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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby CDW6212R » Fri May 30, 2014 7:21 pm

I thought that you may have a wheel already in mind, thus a size to compare with. The 225/60/16 is a decent size for a passenger car, but most enthusiasts will go for a tire wider for sure, and these days people like way big wheels(20" etc).

I'd stay in the 16-18" wheel diameter, the weight goes up fast with bigger, or cheap quality wheels. There are many OEM Mustang wheels from the 94-04 range that could be used, and possibly all would work without wheel spacers, meaning the offset(center of wheel side to side, versus the hub face surface(30mm offset means the hub face of the wheel is 30mm outboard from the actual center of the wheel(if you cut it in half))).

The stock rim is only 7" wide, so it's not ideal to use a 245mm wide tire on that(20mm wider than stock). That ends up with the tire wider than the wheel enough that the car will "wiggle" a bit side to side. The steering wheel will take more movement to make it turn, or the car doesn't feel like it turns as quick as you are used to.

The stock tires is already on the tall side, you don't want to go much taller(diameter). So you can stay near the stock diameter(I think it's around 27"), but alter the wheel diameter(17, 18"), and the width slightly.

Look at your car and other Mark VII's. Try to decide what size you would like, just in general terms of actual height and width. Do the same about the wheels, think about how large you'd like them to be compared to stock 16" and other examples. The narrow down you search to fine tune what you want to try. You have to settle on a wheel, and then find a tire size that will make it close to the idea you have of a diameter and width.
Don
1991 Red Special Edition, my 2nd SE, dead paint, DWS 255/45/17's on 95 Cobra wheels, and soon; DVD/Navi/backup camera, OBDII and the 347, before custom paint.
98 Mountaineer with Continental DWS 255/55/18's, big sway bars, custom brakes. Soon to be A4WD with XP8 bumpers and wing.

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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby Porterhouse » Tue Jun 03, 2014 12:48 pm

I'd say the problem I'm having is that I'm trying to find a tire first. I'm looking for raised white letter like the stock size ones that I have now, but those tires are discontinued. Since I love the way they look on the car I'm trying to find another RWL tire option, and obviously it has to be from a major manufacturer such as BFG and not some off brand purchased simply for appearance sake. So theoretically I'm looking to see what RWL tire options exist and then I guess find a rim that fits. it seems Goodyear is no longer manufacturing RWL in my size. I have no idea what other owners of different types of classic cars might do in my position, as this is the first time I've faced such a situation.
1988 Mark VII LSC, "Old Faithful," 2nd Owner, Cobra R wheels, 1984 "Continental" style nose & badging, 183K, Owned since August 2001
1989 Mark VII LSC (deceased)
1995 Bronco Eddie Bauer, "The Adventuremobile," 351W, 225K, 4" BDS Lift, WAAG brush guard, 2.5" FM Super 44 exhaust, factory cargo shade
2016 Perception Conduit 13-ft kayak, "Colonel Sanders," technically a vehicle, new favorite toy.

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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby CDW6212R » Tue Jun 03, 2014 1:47 pm

Try the Tire Rack for ideas, and brand choices etc. Use the 225/60/16 tire as an example to enter for finding what they have. I recall there being over 50 to choose from over ten years ago. You want to find any tire size that is common first, to see what a large group of tire look like. Find those that you generally like for the RWL and brands etc.

Then right there on those tire pages, there are links that will show you what other sizes are available in that model of tire. With a little browsing there, I think you can narrow down your brand choice, and have some idea of what sizes there are.

When you look at the list for the stock tire size, find the specs link early on too, and find the official diameter of your tires. That figure will be important to help find other tires which are close in diameter to that. You can move away bigger or smaller a little bit, but that should be a guide to stay near, to keep the speedometer close.

Find a few examples of what tires you like(visually), and then copy and paste the links to those, into a post here. Open a tab just for the forum post, so you can copy/paste the links into a post here. Then you/we can narrow down your possible tire(and wheel) sizes.
Don
1991 Red Special Edition, my 2nd SE, dead paint, DWS 255/45/17's on 95 Cobra wheels, and soon; DVD/Navi/backup camera, OBDII and the 347, before custom paint.
98 Mountaineer with Continental DWS 255/55/18's, big sway bars, custom brakes. Soon to be A4WD with XP8 bumpers and wing.

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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby Porterhouse » Tue Jun 03, 2014 2:04 pm

so far I've been looking at the options for the 225/60 and 250/60 and nothing has jumped out at me. It doesn't look like they even have rwl in a usable size. I'd be willing to settle for an attractive blackwall if I could find one, but so far they're all rather bland. I suppose I'll have to keep looking, perhaps by manufacturer instead of size. I'm trying to stay with a decent brand, and nothing that sounds "foreign" either (meaning no kumho, no nitto, nothing ricey. Michelins are ok though). Slim pickings. I just don't understand what has happened to the tire market.
1988 Mark VII LSC, "Old Faithful," 2nd Owner, Cobra R wheels, 1984 "Continental" style nose & badging, 183K, Owned since August 2001
1989 Mark VII LSC (deceased)
1995 Bronco Eddie Bauer, "The Adventuremobile," 351W, 225K, 4" BDS Lift, WAAG brush guard, 2.5" FM Super 44 exhaust, factory cargo shade
2016 Perception Conduit 13-ft kayak, "Colonel Sanders," technically a vehicle, new favorite toy.

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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby CDW6212R » Tue Jun 03, 2014 2:29 pm

The real issue is that everything has gone big, and way bigger. Stock cars and trucks now usually have 18-20" wheels/tires now. I like the handling aspect, but the extra weight hurts fuel economy. I've got 18's on my Mercury, and I want to find a lighter wheel, a strong forged wheel in 17-18" size. Those give me the option to run an available 275/55 sized tire, which are also still rather heavy. That's a truck so it is not as bad as a car might be to have a 60lbs+ wheel/tire on it.
Don
1991 Red Special Edition, my 2nd SE, dead paint, DWS 255/45/17's on 95 Cobra wheels, and soon; DVD/Navi/backup camera, OBDII and the 347, before custom paint.
98 Mountaineer with Continental DWS 255/55/18's, big sway bars, custom brakes. Soon to be A4WD with XP8 bumpers and wing.

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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby Porterhouse » Tue Jun 03, 2014 3:43 pm

I want tires like these:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp ... dial+T%2FA

But the closest I can come are these:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp ... &tab=Sizes

Those aren't *horrible* but they're not RWL, they ARE expensive, and I wouldn't even know what size rim to pair them with - if they even make a rim that size that fits the Mark, and if such a rim exists I bet they're costly.

EDiT:

Here's why I'm confused. What's the difference between these, at $134 per tire...
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp ... mpare1=yes

and these, at $172 per tire?
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp ... mpare1=yes
1988 Mark VII LSC, "Old Faithful," 2nd Owner, Cobra R wheels, 1984 "Continental" style nose & badging, 183K, Owned since August 2001
1989 Mark VII LSC (deceased)
1995 Bronco Eddie Bauer, "The Adventuremobile," 351W, 225K, 4" BDS Lift, WAAG brush guard, 2.5" FM Super 44 exhaust, factory cargo shade
2016 Perception Conduit 13-ft kayak, "Colonel Sanders," technically a vehicle, new favorite toy.

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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby CDW6212R » Tue Jun 03, 2014 8:17 pm

Those are good links for examples, comparing etc. The Radial T/A has become an old style that they seem to only make in older sizes. They do have one that I think is really close to a mid 80's 15" Mark VII stock size, like a 215/65/15. I'd want something at least the 225mm width like most LSC's came with.

The price difference for the last pair is due to the speed rating, one is an "H" 130mph tire, and the other is "V" rated, which is in the 150-160mph+ range. It's about how much heat the tire can take at higher speeds.

With your 2nd link for the T/A KDWS tires I hit the link leading to that "type" of tire, Ultra High Performance All-Season tires. That is the best level of all around high performance tires, on the high price side, tend to do well in rain, and some snow. Look at that page showing brands and their lines for that kind of tire.
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/types/uhpas.jsp

I picked the Continental tire to see what sizes those come in which might be in the 26.6" diameter range. Those also happen to be the exact tires which I put on my Mark VII and my SUV. I picked it for a great rain tire, I have had poor luck with other tires I've tried, to get safer rain traction. So far I like these a lot in the rain, and the brief snow we had here a few days to drive in.

Continental is a top brand tire, I'd put them against Michelin any day for performance and quality.

Finding any white lettered tire in a size near what we need will be tough. I was hoping that T/A line might have something a little wider than they do.

Look at that page I linked to above, you can go there and jump to the other tires, and then the specs link of any of them, to see a list of tire sizes for each. The column for diameter is the big one to watch, to avoid the tires which are way too short, or tall. Here's the specs page for that Continental tire, with the 245/50/17" size highlighted. I picked that one because it was an OEM size for a Jaguar my uncle had, and I considered it for my Mark VII many years ago. That would be very close in diameter to the 225/60/16 size. You can find wheels in 17" far easier than 18's or bigger. You may still end up trying to stick with a 16" wheel and tire, but as you are finding, the available sizes are tending to be more for larger wheels(17-19's).
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp ... &tab=Sizes

I hope I have helped you in some way, if only to help you to steer your search to what you want.
Don
1991 Red Special Edition, my 2nd SE, dead paint, DWS 255/45/17's on 95 Cobra wheels, and soon; DVD/Navi/backup camera, OBDII and the 347, before custom paint.
98 Mountaineer with Continental DWS 255/55/18's, big sway bars, custom brakes. Soon to be A4WD with XP8 bumpers and wing.

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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby Porterhouse » Wed Jun 04, 2014 7:20 pm

Well, Don, as I read your post two things occur to me. One is just that it would be amusingly appropriate to put Continental tires on a Continental (which, strictly speaking, these cars are) but the other is that unless I found a tire I really fell in love with, I really can't justify buying a new set of rims for a car for which I already have two full sets of wheels. Maybe someday as a treat, or if I find a "perfect" rwl tire, but certainly not now, not when so many more critical jobs make demands on my budget.
I must say this does help somewhat as far as actually narrowing down my choices.
1988 Mark VII LSC, "Old Faithful," 2nd Owner, Cobra R wheels, 1984 "Continental" style nose & badging, 183K, Owned since August 2001
1989 Mark VII LSC (deceased)
1995 Bronco Eddie Bauer, "The Adventuremobile," 351W, 225K, 4" BDS Lift, WAAG brush guard, 2.5" FM Super 44 exhaust, factory cargo shade
2016 Perception Conduit 13-ft kayak, "Colonel Sanders," technically a vehicle, new favorite toy.

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Re: A Guide to Tire Sizes

Postby CDW6212R » Wed Jun 04, 2014 9:34 pm

That's still good, you know what you might do later if you find a special wheel or tire you think would be great.

I am also very picky about wheels, I rarely see any wheel that I'd like to have for my cars. I tend to like the OEM wheels the best, or things which resemble them a lot. I've been slowly browsing for a wheel that I could live with for my SUV. I need one that is lighter than the cheap aftermarket 18's I bought ten years ago. I kind of found one recently, and then discovered that it's been discontinued. Keep an eye out, maybe something will turn your head then.

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Don
1991 Red Special Edition, my 2nd SE, dead paint, DWS 255/45/17's on 95 Cobra wheels, and soon; DVD/Navi/backup camera, OBDII and the 347, before custom paint.
98 Mountaineer with Continental DWS 255/55/18's, big sway bars, custom brakes. Soon to be A4WD with XP8 bumpers and wing.

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