Transmission Cooling Lines

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Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby DBS » Tue Mar 05, 2013 2:14 pm

RE: 1986 Mark VII

Has anyone had an issue replacing the quick diconnect type fittings at the trans case & radiator with a direct fitting w/barbed ends then running a hyd. hose between them?
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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby CDW6212R » Tue Mar 05, 2013 3:19 pm

You can do that but take care to use only high pressure fittings and hose. I like to use the steel lines when possible, and the common steel fuel line available at parts stores matches the fittings of most Fords.
Don
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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby DBS » Tue Mar 05, 2013 4:42 pm

Yea - line is specifically for transmission cooler. Says so right on the hose! The original quick disconnect fitting on the trans case is leaking bad. I found a tech service bulletin for exactly this issue. Of course thier fix was to cut the end off, slide on a new fitting and double flare the tube. The hose option is an easier fix.
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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby LSC4ME » Tue Mar 05, 2013 7:12 pm

Why would one not just change the O-ring, am I missing something here......
I spent about 10 min changing one on mine, still no leaks, did i do this fix the wrong way?
Is 86 diffrant than 88?
84 LSC DIESEL
84 BASE DIESEL
91 LSC OUR FIRST ONE
92 LSC
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2 81 mark VI
89 towncar
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02 F-350
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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby CDW6212R » Tue Mar 05, 2013 9:34 pm

Some Fords had very odd quick connect fittings, which were supposed to swivel etc, but they do tend to leak after a certain age.

The OEM trans fittings will accept the common fuel lines directly, they crew right in. That is, no matter what fittings combination you have, the normal one at the trans is the only one it should have. If there's something else also, take off all but the last fitting, the one which is in the AOD trans. That one is all you need, to attach a steel line directly. You can and I would add an o-ring down in the fitting, they sometimes leak without one.
Don
1991 Red Special Edition, my 2nd SE, dead paint, DWS 255/45/17's on 95 Cobra wheels, and soon; DVD/Navi/backup camera, OBDII and the 347, before custom paint.
98 Mountaineer with Continental DWS 255/55/18's, big sway bars, custom brakes. Soon to be A4WD with XP8 bumpers and wing.

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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby artbaileyjr » Tue Mar 05, 2013 10:01 pm

There were two types of fittings used. One has a replaceable O-ring. The other is a sealed unit and is not serviceable. (kinda' lame, really) I don't know what years were which, but I've run into both of 'um. Both swivel.

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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby DBS » Wed Mar 06, 2013 10:45 am

The only line I know that is designed to swivel are the power steering lines. The line i am replacing is a hard steel line that goes into a quick disconnect fitting screwed into the transmission case. It is leaking from where the line enters the fitting and not from where the fitting threads into the case. There are no o-rings either - the fitting does not slide back on the steel line after you disconnect it to reveal a flange where an o-ring could reside. To fix this according to the TSB I would have to remove the entire line from the car so I could double flange the end. Instead - found fittings of the right size to thread into the case and the radiator that have a barbed end for a hose connection. Easiest possible fix in my mind.

TSB:

TRANSMISSION - AUTOMATIC - FLUID LEAK Article No.
AT THE COOLER LINE CONNECTIONS 87-18-13
* LEAK - TRANSMISSION FLUID - AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS - COOLER LINE REPAIR

FORD: 1985-87 ALL CAR LINES


LINCOLN-MERCURY: 1985-87 ALL CAR LINES

ISSUE: In the event that service is required for a disconnected automatic transmission cooler line, the quick-connect fitting should not be reused because it may not reseal properly and can result in a repeat repair.

ACTION: To correct this, modify the cooler line(s) attaching hardware using the following service procedure.


Refer to the appropriate Car Shop Manual for cooler line removal.

1. Remove and throw away the quick-connect fitting connector from radiator or transmission case.

NOTE: If there is a disconnected cooler line fitting at the radiator, rework both connectors at radiator. Also, the same rework is required when servicing a disconnected cooler line at transmission case.


2. Cut off tube as close to formed bead using a tube cutter.

3. Slide a 5/16 x 1 /2-20 thread tube nut on the tube.

4. Make a double flare tube end.


5. Install the proper size and type connectors into the transmission case or radiator. Refer to the application chart on page 42 of this TSB. Also, use thread sealer or teflon tape on the male threads of the connector and torque to 18-23 ft.lbs. (24-31 N-m).

6. Install thread tube nut(s) onto connector(s). Torque to 12-18 ft.lbs. (16-24 N-m).


PART NUMBER PART NAME CLASS
EOUZ-7D273-A Connector B
E2TZ-7D273-A Connector BM
E7TZ-7D273-B Connector C
E1FZ-7D273-A Connector BM
87944-S8 Nut C
OTHER APPLICABLE ARTICLES: None
WARRANTY STATUS: Eligible Under Basic Warranty Coverage
OPERATION: SP871813A - Rework any two (2) connections
TIME: 1.0 Hr.
OPERATION: SP871813B - Rework all four (4) connections
TIME: 1.7 Hrs. DLR. CODING: Basic Part No. 7A030 - Code: 48
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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby DBS » Fri Mar 29, 2013 9:20 am

The barbed end fittings at the trans case and the radiator with a hose in between did the trick.
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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby pkv88mkvii » Fri Mar 29, 2013 9:17 pm

CDW6212R wrote:Some Fords had very odd quick connect fittings, which were supposed to swivel etc, but they do tend to leak after a certain age.

The OEM trans fittings will accept the common fuel lines directly, they crew right in. That is, no matter what fittings combination you have, the normal one at the trans is the only one it should have. If there's something else also, take off all but the last fitting, the one which is in the AOD trans. That one is all you need, to attach a steel line directly. You can and I would add an o-ring down in the fitting, they sometimes leak without one.

You can't put an o-ring in the female flare coupling. If you have a leak you have a bad flare. The only way an o-ring would work is if you just snugged the tube nut, and that's not tight enough to keep the connection togehter. If you did tighten it like you're supposed to you would cut the o-ring in half and it would quite possibly wind up jammed in something important in the tranny.
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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby White Lincoln » Sat Mar 30, 2013 4:33 pm

DBS wrote:RE: 1986 Mark VII

Has anyone had an issue replacing the quick diconnect type fittings at the trans case & radiator with a direct fitting w/barbed ends then running a hyd. hose between them?


Here is how I did my tranny cooler. The barbs are mentioned in the article, what size I used, etc.

Hope this helps.

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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby CDW6212R » Sat Mar 30, 2013 6:25 pm

pkv88mkvii wrote:
CDW6212R wrote:Some Fords had very odd quick connect fittings, which were supposed to swivel etc, but they do tend to leak after a certain age.

The OEM trans fittings will accept the common fuel lines directly, they crew right in. That is, no matter what fittings combination you have, the normal one at the trans is the only one it should have. If there's something else also, take off all but the last fitting, the one which is in the AOD trans. That one is all you need, to attach a steel line directly. You can and I would add an o-ring down in the fitting, they sometimes leak without one.

You can't put an o-ring in the female flare coupling. If you have a leak you have a bad flare. The only way an o-ring would work is if you just snugged the tube nut, and that's not tight enough to keep the connection togehter. If you did tighten it like you're supposed to you would cut the o-ring in half and it would quite possibly wind up jammed in something important in the tranny.


Check out Ford OEM trans fittings, many of them have o-rings in them already, factory installed.

I first had to apply that concept when I installed my first trans cooler on my 86 Crown Vic. I bent steel fuel lines from Autozone to fit the car, and no rubber hoses. The fittings did leak at each of the two brass unions I used. I had them awfully tight, and they still leaked. I found o-rings that fit perfectly in the female side, and tightened the fittings moderately, not so tight that soon it would deform. They never leaked, and the o-rings were unharmed, slightly squished but not cut. I reused them a couple of times when I had a cooler leak, twice. Those were OEM police engine coolers I used, sturdy but the NPT fittings had to be good and tight also(with teflon tape).
Don
1991 Red Special Edition, my 2nd SE, dead paint, DWS 255/45/17's on 95 Cobra wheels, and soon; DVD/Navi/backup camera, OBDII and the 347, before custom paint.
98 Mountaineer with Continental DWS 255/55/18's, big sway bars, custom brakes. Soon to be A4WD with XP8 bumpers and wing.

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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby White Lincoln » Mon Apr 01, 2013 9:51 am

Eu. That sounds like A LOT of work bending metal tubing to fit! :o

The barb fittings that came with the tranny cooler kit would not fit the threads of the Mark VII radiator or the cooling lines and the ones I menetioned are the correct thread size for the Mark VII (all years?). No leaks no squeaks! I did use teflon tape on the threads of course.
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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby pkv88mkvii » Mon Apr 01, 2013 11:41 pm

CDW6212R wrote:
pkv88mkvii wrote:
CDW6212R wrote:Some Fords had very odd quick connect fittings, which were supposed to swivel etc, but they do tend to leak after a certain age.

The OEM trans fittings will accept the common fuel lines directly, they crew right in. That is, no matter what fittings combination you have, the normal one at the trans is the only one it should have. If there's something else also, take off all but the last fitting, the one which is in the AOD trans. That one is all you need, to attach a steel line directly. You can and I would add an o-ring down in the fitting, they sometimes leak without one.

You can't put an o-ring in the female flare coupling. If you have a leak you have a bad flare. The only way an o-ring would work is if you just snugged the tube nut, and that's not tight enough to keep the connection togehter. If you did tighten it like you're supposed to you would cut the o-ring in half and it would quite possibly wind up jammed in something important in the tranny.


Check out Ford OEM trans fittings, many of them have o-rings in them already, factory installed.

I first had to apply that concept when I installed my first trans cooler on my 86 Crown Vic. I bent steel fuel lines from Autozone to fit the car, and no rubber hoses. The fittings did leak at each of the two brass unions I used. I had them awfully tight, and they still leaked. I found o-rings that fit perfectly in the female side, and tightened the fittings moderately, not so tight that soon it would deform. They never leaked, and the o-rings were unharmed, slightly squished but not cut. I reused them a couple of times when I had a cooler leak, twice. Those were OEM police engine coolers I used, sturdy but the NPT fittings had to be good and tight also(with teflon tape).

If there was an o-ring in a factory female flare it was probably machined a little differently. I'm not trying to argue for the sake of arguing, but if a flare doesn't seal of it's own accord there's a problem. By your logic that approach would be OK on a brake line and that would be a disaster. Likewise if a flare connection can seal 1000+ psi in a brake system, a proper flare would have no problem on a tranny cooler line.
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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby CDW6212R » Tue Apr 02, 2013 4:11 pm

I was working with the typical parts store fuel lines, steel in many lengths. Those are probably not manufactured with the perfect dimensions to seal great in many high pressure systems. The brass unions I used with them did have a noticeable seat/pocket at the base which the o-rings fit well in. I don't use o-rings out of habit, but the OEM lines at the trans case gave me the idea. I removed them from the 1986 Crown Vic AOD, and I picked one out of the case adapter to see if it really was an o-ring. I replaced that one, and when the lines I added leaked, I immediately thought of the o-ring idea.

I have made one flared brake line junction, using two OEM lines to make one, and a union. Thankfully I did it right the first time, and it never leaked. Knock on wood, those have to be done right.
Don
1991 Red Special Edition, my 2nd SE, dead paint, DWS 255/45/17's on 95 Cobra wheels, and soon; DVD/Navi/backup camera, OBDII and the 347, before custom paint.
98 Mountaineer with Continental DWS 255/55/18's, big sway bars, custom brakes. Soon to be A4WD with XP8 bumpers and wing.

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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby DBS » Wed Apr 03, 2013 11:43 am

White Lincoln wrote:Eu. That sounds like A LOT of work bending metal tubing to fit! :o

The barb fittings that came with the tranny cooler kit would not fit the threads of the Mark VII radiator or the cooling lines and the ones I menetioned are the correct thread size for the Mark VII (all years?). No leaks no squeaks! I did use teflon tape on the threads of course.



Yea - I had to go buy an individual fitting for the radiator side. The kit by itself did not work for both ends. Needed two of the same size.
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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby beek0 » Wed Apr 03, 2013 10:29 pm

Replacement disconnects for the transmission lines are available at Auto Zone and Advance Auto. At Auto Zone look in the help section- part # 800-608. Advance uses the same part number but can not remember what brand it is. These have 1/4" - 18 thread and made for the 5/16" trans. line. The top trans. line on the radiator was leaking on my 1988 BB and I just changed in about 10 minutes. Use a small screwdriver to pry out the plastic piece between the line and the fitting and then the line will pull out. Unscrew the fitting - screw the new on in - push the line back in. Done. The new fitting came with thread seal on the threads, but I also put an o ring on it.









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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby murdomino » Thu May 30, 2013 2:58 am

So thankful for the forum... i recently swapped out my transmission and now my lower trans cooler line at the trans is leaking. so pissed at first after i crawled under there and found i couldnt tighten it up. but lthank you BEEK for that part number, autozone will be visited tomorrow.
I bleed oval blue!
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Re: Transmission Cooling Lines

Postby beek0 » Mon Apr 25, 2016 9:56 am

Just replaced a fitting on the transmission and was able to use the same quick disconnect tool that is used for the fuel filter.
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