CONTINUITY. WHAT WHY HOW.

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CONTINUITY. WHAT WHY HOW.

Postby oldschool1 » Thu May 14, 2009 2:37 am

CONTINUITY. WHAT WHY HOW.

WHAT IS CONTINUITY - If a circuit has a path through which electricity can flow, it is said to have continuity. A circuit with continuity is termed "closed". If current cannot flow, because of extremely high resistance or a break in the circuit, the circuit is said to be "open" or to have no continuity. Testing for continuity lets you know if a circuit is open or closed.

WHY TEST FOR CONTINUITY - Testing for continuity can help you identify good or blown fuses, open or shorted wires or conductors, operational switches, and circuit paths. If a fuse is blown, there will be no continuity across the test points. If a switch is not functioning properly, there will be no continuity regardless of switch position. A useful continuity test would be to verify that there is a good connection between wires. Let's say you've just crimped two wires together and want to find out if your connection is good. To test this, you would touch one probe from your meter to one side of the connection, and then the other probe to the other side of the connection. If there is good continuity, you should get a low resistance measurement (typically 0-1 ohm) and a solid beep (from most DMMs).

HOW TO TEST FOR CONTINUITY
1. Turn off the power to the circuit. If a voltage source is connected to the circuit during this test, you will damage the meter.
2. Select "resistance" on your Analog Multimeter (AMM) or select "continuity" on your Digital Multimeter (DMM). An analog meter should be zeroed before each use.
3. Touch the probe tips across the component or portion of the circuit for which you want to determine continuity.
4. Read the meter. If the reading is low, it means you have continuity (the circuit is closed). If the reading is "infinity", it means there is no continuity (the circuit is open).


Last bumped by oldschool1 on Thu May 14, 2009 2:37 am.
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